UPDATE: Fire at landfill site took nearly 24 hours to put out

A large fire at a landfill site at Castle Cary on the Somerset border took nearly 24 hours to put our.

The fire started at the Dimmer Landfill Site, near Castle Cary, at around 4.30pm on Bank Holiday Monday (August 28) with residents being advised to keep their windows and doors shut.

On Tuesday, August 29 a Devon and Somerset Fire Service spokesman told Somerset Live said: “Fire measuring approximately 100m by 100m in landfill site extinguished using 6 mains jets. Crew utilised on site machinery to removed overspill, water supplies secured from the River Alford using the high volume pump. Various hydrants around Castle Cary were used throughout the incident using 2 water carriers and fire appliances to shuttle water.”

The large plume of smoke from the landfill fire could be seen from miles around, including by passengers on the Exeter to Reading rail line, and local residents had been told to keep doors and windows shut because of the potential environmental impact.

A spokesman for Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service said: “Fire Control received several calls to reports of smoke issuing from the area of Dimmer Landfill Site.

One fire appliance from Castle Cary was mobilised. On arrival, crews requested further assistance.

“Crews from Wincanton, Yeovil, Shepton Mallet and Somerton along with specialist appliances from Street and Bridgwater were also mobilised, soon after, the incident was escalated to 12 pumps and the high volume pump from Taunton.

“Dorset & Wiltshire are also providing appliances to assist Devon & Somerset with this incident.

“This is a fire involving approx. 100m by 100m of landfill, deep seated. Crews are currently at work with 6 attack jets. The high volume pump will shortly be setting in to the River Brue for water.

“The fire service are aware of the large smoke plume and the environmental impact this causes, we are advising all local residents to keep windows and doors closed. Environment Agency are currently monitoring the air.”

According to the Somerset Waste Partnership website materials accepted at this centre include batteries, electrical appliances, fridges, furniture, garden waste, gas bottles, plastic, scrap metal and oil.

It is not known how the fire started at this stage.